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I’m assuming that if you teach religion in a Catholic School you are a “Jesus Teacher” but are you using technology? Why not? Look at your students do you think they can be engaged by a lecture and a power point?  

I’m assuming that if you teach religion in a Catholic School you are a “Jesus Teacher” but are you using technology? Why not? Look at your students do you think they can be engaged by a lecture and a power point?  The fact is that they speak a different language than we do, their language is technology! They speak, communicate, create and think in this new language so if you want to teach them you need to learn their language.

Teachers in other subjects are realizing this and you can find great technologically integrated lesson plans on the web; but what about us?  We are falling behind yet what is more important than learning and knowing Christ? We need to be like the missionaries of old that upon arriving to a new territory would learn the language of the land and preach the good news. Sometimes they had to create an alphabet for them just so they could give them the Bible. We need to make our classrooms interactive, student-centered and preach Christ with Java and Flash and Blogs and Podcasts.

How do we do this? You don’t need a degree in technology to learn to use the web 2.0 tools that are available and create lessons that use it effectively. We must go beyond simple translation of an old lesson plan we must create assignments that would be impossible to do without the technology.

I admit it can be challenging at first but it is our calling to reach them where they are at. You can find more of my lessons on my blog:www.jesusteachertech.com . However it is only a start we need to work together and create a database of lessons that match every framework so that no matter the topic religion teachers can find help introducing technology in their classroom. I finish with a quote from Marc Presnky.

Today’s students – K through college – represent the first generations to grow up with this new technology. They have spent their entire lives surrounded by and using computers, videogames, digital music players, video cams, cell phones, and all the other toys and tools of the digital age. Today‟s average college grads have spent less than 5,000 hours of their lives reading, but over 10,000 hours playing video games (not to mention 20,000 hours watching TV). Computer games, email, the Internet, cell phones and instant messaging are integral parts of their lives.  – Marc Presnky

 

BIO

Carmen Ribera teaches Religion to at J. Serra Catholic High School in California and is a  specialist in  Theology of the Body, Sacraments and Morality.  She holds a B.A. from Thomas Aquinas College and is currently pursuing an M.A. in Educational Technology at Azusa Pacific University. She is passionate about the integration of technology in the classroom and teaching the Catholic Faith.

In the forum below share your ideas about how technology can be used to share the Gospel with your students. What are you doing that works?